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Volume 8 Issue 9 (September, 2020)

Original Articles

A study to determine the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome among neonates in a tertiary care hospital
Prashant Kumar Choudhary, Saurabh Piparsania, Unique Sagar

Background: Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common respiratory disorder of neonates that causes admission of neonates to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and cause respiratory failure in neonates. The present study was conducted to determine the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome among neonates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive analytical study was carried out at the NICU ward in a tertiary care center over a period of 6 months. The sample size was taken 440. Data was retrospectively collected of both infants and their mothers. A trained research team member collected the data. The incidence of RDS in the study was calculated as the number of infants with RDS divided by the total number of infants born at term during the study period. The software package SPSS version 21 was used to perform the statistical analysis. Results: In the present study total neonates were 440 in which 56.81.57% were males and 43.18% were females. The gestational age ≥37 weeks was in 64.54% neonates and <37 weeks in 35.45% neonates. The Respiratory distress syndrome was present in 37.5% neonates. The respiratory distress syndrome was present in males (59.39%) more than female neonates. It was was present in 38.78% neonates with gestational age ≥37 weeks and 61.21% neonates with gestational age <37 weeks. It was also found that 63.63% vaginally delivered babies and 36.36% LSCS babies had respiratory distress. Conclusion: This study concluded that Respiratory distress syndrome was present in 37.5% neonates. It was present more in male neonates, neonates with gestational age <37 weeks, vaginally delivered babies. Keywords: extremely preterm, very preterm, moderate preterm, Respiratory distress syndrome.

 
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